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Top 10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

Posted in Uncategorized on August 16, 2011 by Patel smital

22 reported dog bite related human fatalities in the United States in 2004. 2005 – 29 human fatalities. 2006 – 26. In 2007, there were 33 human fatalities. 45% of the attacks occurred to adults over the age of 18, and 55% occurred to ages below. Pit bull type dogs were responsible for 67% of fatalities, the next closest breed was the rottweiler at 12%. But all dog breeds are potentially dangerous. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that 25 breeds of dogs were involved in 238 fatal dog bites from 1979-1998. Here it is the compiled list of the most dangerous dog breeds:

1. Pit Bulls (Weight: 55-65 lbs.)

Pit BullsPit bull is one of the most brave and dauntless dogs that usually takes on any opponent. Therefore they take part in dog fighting. It is common knowledge that this dog breed can even mangle the human to death as pit bull locks its jaws onto the booty until it is dead.

2. Rottweilers (Weight: 100-130 lbs.)

RottweilersDue to their intense territorial instinct these dogs are very aggressive. Rottweilers are commonly used as guard dogs.

3. German Shepherds (Weight: 70-100 lbs.)

German ShepherdsThis breed of dogs is known as a smart and vigilant one. As German Shepherds proved to be confident and fearless local authorities such as the police K-9 unit use German Shepherds as a police dog.

4. Huskies (Weight: 44-66 lbs.)

HuskiesDespite of their energy and intelligence this breed is not regarded a good guard dog. It is caused by its kind temperament and personality characteristics. However it should be marked that between 1979 and 1997 fifteen fatal cases were caused by huskies.

5. Alaskan Malamutes (Weight: 75-100 lbs.)

Alaskan MalamutesThis breed requires a lot of exercises to be happy as being bored they become disobedient. On the whole their characteristic features are energy and activity.

6. Doberman Pinschers (Weight: 65-90 lbs.)

Doberman PinschersDoberman Pinschers are famed by such features as alertness, intelligence and loyalty. Therefore they are considered to be one of the best guard dog breeds. The dog usually attacks only in case its family is in danger or when being provoked.

7. Chow Chow (Weight: 50-70 lbs.)

Chow ChowThe Chow Chow seems to be distant and independent, however they require staunch attention. If badly bred they can become aggressive dogs.

8. Presa Canario ( Weight: 80-115 lbs.)

Presa CanarioIt is well known that an attack of this guard dog can bring to the death any prey. One of the main features of this dog is fearlessness, huge power and man-stopping ability.

9. Boxer (Weight: 50-70 lbs.)

BoxerThese dogs are intelligent, frisky and full of energy. It is not so easy to train them as they are self-willed breed. In addition, boxers are not typically aggressive by nature.

10. Dalmatian (Weight: 40-70 lbs.)

DalmatianThis breed is distinguished by intelligence and perfect memory, independence and survival instincts. Sometimes Dalmatians can be aggressive towards people.

Top 10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

Posted in Uncategorized on August 16, 2011 by Patel smital

22 reported dog bite related human fatalities in the United States in 2004. 2005 – 29 human fatalities. 2006 – 26. In 2007, there were 33 human fatalities. 45% of the attacks occurred to adults over the age of 18, and 55% occurred to ages below. Pit bull type dogs were responsible for 67% of fatalities, the next closest breed was the rottweiler at 12%. But all dog breeds are potentially dangerous. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that 25 breeds of dogs were involved in 238 fatal dog bites from 1979-1998. Here it is the compiled list of the most dangerous dog breeds:

1. Pit Bulls (Weight: 55-65 lbs.)

Pit BullsPit bull is one of the most brave and dauntless dogs that usually takes on any opponent. Therefore they take part in dog fighting. It is common knowledge that this dog breed can even mangle the human to death as pit bull locks its jaws onto the booty until it is dead.

2. Rottweilers (Weight: 100-130 lbs.)

RottweilersDue to their intense territorial instinct these dogs are very aggressive. Rottweilers are commonly used as guard dogs.

3. German Shepherds (Weight: 70-100 lbs.)

German ShepherdsThis breed of dogs is known as a smart and vigilant one. As German Shepherds proved to be confident and fearless local authorities such as the police K-9 unit use German Shepherds as a police dog.

4. Huskies (Weight: 44-66 lbs.)

HuskiesDespite of their energy and intelligence this breed is not regarded a good guard dog. It is caused by its kind temperament and personality characteristics. However it should be marked that between 1979 and 1997 fifteen fatal cases were caused by huskies.

5. Alaskan Malamutes (Weight: 75-100 lbs.)

Alaskan MalamutesThis breed requires a lot of exercises to be happy as being bored they become disobedient. On the whole their characteristic features are energy and activity.

6. Doberman Pinschers (Weight: 65-90 lbs.)

Doberman PinschersDoberman Pinschers are famed by such features as alertness, intelligence and loyalty. Therefore they are considered to be one of the best guard dog breeds. The dog usually attacks only in case its family is in danger or when being provoked.

7. Chow Chow (Weight: 50-70 lbs.)

Chow ChowThe Chow Chow seems to be distant and independent, however they require staunch attention. If badly bred they can become aggressive dogs.

8. Presa Canario ( Weight: 80-115 lbs.)

Presa CanarioIt is well known that an attack of this guard dog can bring to the death any prey. One of the main features of this dog is fearlessness, huge power and man-stopping ability.

9. Boxer (Weight: 50-70 lbs.)

BoxerThese dogs are intelligent, frisky and full of energy. It is not so easy to train them as they are self-willed breed. In addition, boxers are not typically aggressive by nature.

10. Dalmatian (Weight: 40-70 lbs.)

DalmatianThis breed is distinguished by intelligence and perfect memory, independence and survival instincts. Sometimes Dalmatians can be aggressive towards people.

10 Most Beautiful Bridges in the World

Posted in Uncategorized on March 18, 2010 by Patel smital

We’ve come a long way in bridge building since crossing a river on a fallen log. The first bridges were built with wooden planks, ropes and stones. Soon, stronger material were required. Wood and stone bridges gave way to iron, then to steel ones. Bridge building techniques also evolved: beam, cantilevered, cable-stayed, and suspension bridges – each with advantages that made it the right choice for a particular location.

Political fortunes and wars have been made or lost by bridges. Throughout history, bridges had been built by engineers and burned by warriors, and crossed by kings and commoners alike. Millions of people owe their livelihood to bridges, as most require them to commute; and yet thousands of people choose to end their lives by jumping off them every year.

Bridges are stylish: from classical to modern, they are as much a work of art as they are marvels of engineering. To celebrate the wonders of “classic” bridges, here are Neatorama’s picks for the Top 10 Most Beautiful Bridges in the World:

10. Khaju Bridge


Photo: twocentsworth [Flickr]


Khaju Bridge at night. Photo: Jovika [Flickr]

The Khaju Bridge (Pol-e-Khajoo) in Isfahan, Iran, was built in the 17th century by Shah Abbas II. The bridge also serves as a dam, with sluice gates under the archways. When the gates are closed, the water level behind the bridge is raised to irrigate gardens alongside the Zayandeh River.

The Khoju Bridge has two stories of arcades, marked by the distinctive intersecting arches decorated with richly colored tiles. At the center of the bridge, there are two large pavilions, called the Prince Parlors, that were originally reserved for the Shah.

9. Pont du Gard


Pont du Gard. Photo: zak mc [Flickr]

Pont du Gard, an aqueduct spanning the Gard River in southern France, is a masterpiece of Roman engineering. It wasn’t built to transport people (though there is a pedestrian footbridge on it) – instead, it was part of a complex aqueduct system that carried water over 30 miles (about 50 km) to the ancient Roman city of Nemausus (now Nîmes).

The Pont du Gard was built by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (63 – 12 BC), the son-in-law of Caesar Augustus. The bridge’s stones, some of which weigh up to 6 tons, were cut perfectly to fit together without any mortar.

The wedge-shaped stones, known as voussoirs, were arranged in three levels, the top-most being the water conduit. So precise was the engineering that the entire system descends only 56 ft. (17 m) vertically – over 30 miles! – to deliver 5 million gallons (20,00 m3) of water to the city.

8. Bridge of Sighs


The Bridge of Sighs. Photo: Eugenia y Julian [Flickr]

In the 19th century, Lord Byron named a Venetian limestone bridge across the Rio di Palazzo connecting the Doge’s prison to the interrogation room in the main palace, the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri). Supposedly, the prisoners would sigh when they look out the window – with stone bars no less – to see their last view of beautiful Venice before their imprisonment, torture or execution.

In reality, Doge’s prison held mostly small-time criminals. Also, the bridge was built in 1600 by Antonio Contino, after the days of the inquisitions and summary executions. Legend has it that if lovers kissed on a gondola underneath the Bridge of Sighs at sunset, their love would last for eternity.

7. Iron Bridge


Iron Bridge. Photo: johnmuk [Flickr]


Iron bridge at night. Notice how the bridge and its reflection make a perfect circle.
Photo: Mark Haythorne [Flickr]

The Iron Bridge, spanning the Severn river in Shropshire, England, isn’t a particularly large or ornate bridge, but it does have something that made it unique: it’s the first bridge made completely out of cast iron.

In the 18th century, Shropshire was rich in iron and coal – indeed, there were more iron factories within two-mile radius of the town than any other city in the world. It was also there that iron was first smelt with coke. So it was only natural that the bridge would be made out of iron, a stronger alternative to wood. (Photo of the railing: zorro [Flickr])

Architect Thomas Farnolls Pritchard proposed a single arch bridge that would let boats pass underneath, but he died before the bridge was built. The construction of the Iron Bridge was carried out by a local master ironworker named Abraham Darby III. About 400 tons (363 tonnes) of cast iron was used, with about 800 separate castings. The Iron Bridge has 5 arch ribs, each cast in two halves. It only took three months to put the parts together (which they did using screws instead of bolts!).

The ease and speed of the Iron Bridge’s construction helped convince engineers of the versatility and strength of iron, and helped usher in the Industrial Revolution era. Darby, however, didn’t fare so well: he severely underestimated the cost to build the bridge, and remained in debt for the rest of his life. (Source)

6. Covered Bridges


The West Montrose Covered Bridge on the Grand River, Ontario, Canada. It’s known locally as the Kissing Bridge. Photo: gojumeister [Flickr]


Pisgah Covered Bridge in southern Randolph County, North Carolina. It was washed away by a flood in 2003, but rebuilt with 90% of the original wood. It’s now one of two historic covered bridges left in the state. Photo: jimmywayne22 [Flickr]


Thomas Malone Covered Bridge in Beaver Creek State Park, Ohio.
Photo: c0reyann [Flickr]

Covered bridges are simply that: bridges that have enclosed sides and roof. Though technically the Bridge of Sigh, Ponte Vecchio, and the Wind and Rain Bridges in this list are covered bridges, this term usually means simple, single-lane bridges in rural settings.

Before they are made famous by the 1995 Clint Eastwood film The Bridges of Madison County, “kissing bridges” or “tunnels of love” have been the pride and joy of many small towns across Europe and especially Northern America where more than ten thousands of such bridges were built.

In the 19th century, timber was plentiful and cheap (or, in many cases, free). So it’s natural that these bridges were made of wood. But why were they covered? Well, lovers aside, the real reason was much more practical: the wooden beams of the bridge lasted longer when protected from the elements.

Unfortunately, due to neglect, theft of lumber, vandalism, and fire, most covered bridges in the United States and Canada have disappeared.

5. Ponte Vecchio


Ponte Vecchio. Photo: G|o®g|O


Ponte Vecchio at night. Photo: MrUllmi [Flickr]

The Ponte Vecchio is a medieval bridge over the Arno River. Actually, it’s much more than a bridge – it’s a street, a marketplace, and a landmark of Florence, Italy.

The Ponte Vecchio that we know today was built in 1345 by Taddeo Gaddi after an older span was destroyed in a flood. To finance the bridge, lots along the roadway were rented out to merchants, especially butchers and tanners, to hawk their wares.

In 1565, Duke Cosimo I de Medici ordered an architect named Giorgio Vasari to construct a roofed passageway. Soon after, jewelers, goldsmiths, and merchants of luxury goods pushed out the butchers out of Ponte Vecchio. Centuries of haphazard additions gave the bridge’s distinctive, irregular appearance today.

During World War II, after having survived many floods, the bridge faced its gravest threat: German bombers were blowing up bridges in Florence. It was a direct order from Hitler that spared Ponte Vecchio from certain destruction.

It is said that the word “bankruptcy” came from Ponte Vecchio. When a merchant failed to pay his debt, the table (“banco”) he used to sell his wares was broken (“rotto”) by soldiers. Not having a table anymore (“bancorotto”), meant the seller was bankrupt.

4. The Wind and Rain Bridge


Chengyang Bridge. Photo: mazakii that genius [Flickr]

The wind and rain bridges were a type of bridge built by the Dong people (a minority ethnic group) in China. Because they live in the lowlands and the valleys with many rivers, the Dong people are excellent bridge builders. They are called “wind and rain” bridges because the covered bridges not only let people cross the river, but also protect them from the elements.

The Dong people don’t use nails or rivets to build these bridges – instead, they dovetail all of the wood. The largest and most magnificent is the Chenyang Bridge, spanning the Linxi River near the Dong village of Maan. The bridge is about 100 years old, and like all wind and rain bridges, it was built without a single nail.

3. Brooklyn Bridge


Brooklyn Bridge. Photo: Dennis Gerbeckx [Flickr]


Brooklyn Bridge at sunrise. Photo: LemonSunrise [Flickr]

In 1855, engineer John Roebling started to design a bridge that at the time would be the longest suspension bridge in the world, with towers being the tallest structures in the Western Hemisphere: the Brooklyn Bridge in New York.

Today, the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the main crossings of the East River and one of the most heavily trafficked bridges in the world. But in the late 19th century, it took Roebling more than 14 years to convince the city to build the bridge.

After he got approval, Roebling was surveying a site when his foot was crushed by a ferry. Three weeks before the scheduled groundbreaking, he died of tetanus. His son, an engineer named Washington Roebling took over the project.

In 1872, while working on caissons to set the foundation for the towers, Washington fell ill with caisson disease (a decompression sickness commonly known as “the bends”) that left him barely able to see, talk, or write. His wife, Emily Warren Roebling, rose to the occasion – she learned engineering on the fly and for nine years went to the job site to deliver her husband’s directions. Washington himself was said to watch the construction from his room through a binocular.

When the Brooklyn Bridge was opened, Emily was honored with the first ride over the bridge. She held a rooster, a symbol of victory, in her lap. Washington himself rarely visited the bridge till his death in 1926.

One interesting note about the Brooklyn Bridge: it stood fast while other bridges built around the same time had crumbled. Engineers credit Roebling for designing a bridge and truss system six times as strong as he thought it needed to be!

2. Tower Bridge


Tower Bridge at twilight. Photo: Diliff [wikipedia]


Tower Bridge at night. Photo: Andreas L [Flickr]

It’s funny to think about ancient traffic jams, but that was why the Tower Bridge in London, England was built. By the end of the 19th century, the development of the eastern part of London caused such a load on the London Bridge that the city decided to build a new bridge.

Construction of the Tower Bridge started in 1886, led by architect Sir Horace Jones and engineer Sir John Wolfe Barry. The design was a bascule (draw) bridge with two towers built on piers, so the bridge wouldn’t interefere with the port facilities nearby.

A year after construction was started, Jones died and his replacement, George D. Stevenson along with Barry decided to modify the design a little bit. Instead of the original brick facade design, the Tower Bridge had a more ornate Victorian Gothic style meant to harmonize it with the nearby Tower of London.

When the bridge opened in 1894, the public was aghast. H. Heathcote Statham, Fellow of the Royal Insitute of British Architect, wrote the familiar sentiment as thus: “The Tower Bridge … represents the vice of tawdriness and pretentiousness, and of falsification of the actual facts of the structure.” (Source: Waddell, J., Bridge Engineering, Google Books)

But over time, people warmed up to the bridge. Indeed, the Tower Bridge grew to be one of London’s most recognizable landmarks. Even one of its loudest critics, architectural critic Eric de Maré conceded: the British people “have grown fond of the old fraud … and we must admit that it has carried on its task with admirable regularity and efficiency.” (Source: Dupré, J., Bridges; 1997 Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers)

1. Golden Gate Bridge


Golden Gate Bridge in HDR as the first big storm of the season hits San Francisco.
Photo: vgm8383 [Flickr]


Golden Gate Bridge at sunset. Photo: mischiru [Flickr]


Golden Gate Bridge at night. Photo: justinwyne [Flickr]

The Golden Gate Bridge is such an iconic symbol of San Francisco (and of suspension bridge in general) that it’s hard to imagine a time when it didn’t exist. But before it was built, most people thought it was an impossible task.

In 1916, the idea of a bridge to cross the Golden Gate, a narrow strait that separated San Francisco Peninsula and the Marin Headlands, was conceived. Though it was almost immediately dismissed as the cost was estimated to be $100 million (astronomical for the time), a veteran bridge builder named Joseph Strauss lobbied for more than two decades to have it built.

The Golden Gate Bridge faced tough opposition: the Department of War thought it would interfere with ship traffic and the Southern Pacific Railroad opposed it as competition to its ferry service. At first, even the public didn’t like the bridge … because Strauss’ original design was deemed too ugly! But Strauss finally won, and after 22-years of drumming up support, the bridge was built. (Photo: SF Museum)

Strauss insisted that the project take worker’s safety seriously. It was the first major bridge project that used hard hats and a safety net. During the course of construction, 19 people were saved by the net to become members of the Halfway to Hell Club. (Source)

The color of the Golden Gate Bridge is actually not red – it’s an orange vermillion called International Orange. The color was chosen specifically because it complements the bridge’s natural surrounding yet enhances its visibility in the fog.

Construction took more than four years, at a cost of $27 million. The Golden Gate Bridge actually came in $1.3 million under budget (though 5 months late). For his work, Strauss got $1 million … and a lifetime bridge pass!


We’ll be the first to acknowledge that this list is far from complete. Modern beauties like the Millau Viaduct, the Erasmusbrug, or the Tsing Ma Bridge aren’t on it. (Well, we did say “classic” bridges …)

Nor is this the only “top 10 bridges” list on the Web. Though many of our picks are the same, there are enough differences between this list and others (like Frikoo’s 18 Stunning Bridges From Around the World, and Dark Roasted Blend’s World’s Most Interesting Bridges Part 1 and Part 2) that you should also check them out.

Finally, there are thousands of bridges in the world and hundreds of major bridges that are sources for local prides. If your town’s favorite span isn’t included here, please don’t get mad. Instead, let us know in the comment so interested readers can find them.

Ten Longest Bridges In World

Posted in Uncategorized on March 18, 2010 by Patel smital

Here is a list of the ten longest bridges in the world with pictures and descriptions. Those beautiful photos are showing to us that there are no borders and everything is reachable.

10. Seven Mile Bridge

Seven Mile Bridge

The Seven Mile Bridge, in the Florida Keys, runs over a channel between the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Strait, connecting Key Vaca (the location of the city of Marathon, Florida) in the Middle Keys to Little Duck Key in the Lower Keys. Among the longest bridges in existence when it was built, it is one of the many bridges on US 1 in the Keys, where the road is called the Overseas Highway.

9. San Mateo-Hayward Bridge

San Mateo Hayward Bridge

The San Mateo-Hayward Bridge (commonly called San Mateo Bridge) is a bridge crossing California’s San Francisco Bay in the United States, linking the San Francisco Peninsula with the East Bay. More specifically, the bridge’s western end is in Foster City, the most recent urban addition to the eastern edge of San Mateo. The eastern end of the bridge is in Hayward. The bridge is owned by the state of California, and is maintained by Caltrans, the state highway agency.

8. Confederation Bridge

confederation bridge

The Confederation Bridge (French: Pont de la Confédération) is a bridge spanning the Abegweit Passage of Northumberland Strait, linking Prince Edward Island with mainland New Brunswick, Canada. It was commonly referred to as the “Fixed Link” by residents of Prince Edward Island prior to its official naming. Construction took place from the fall of 1993 to the spring of 1997, costing $1.3 billion. The 12.9-kilometre (8 mi) long bridge opened on 31 May 1997.

7. Rio-Niteroi Bridge

Rio Niteroi Bridge

The Rio-Niteroi Bridge is a reinforced concrete structure that connects the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Niteroi in Brazil.
Construction began symbolically on August 23, 1968, in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in their first and thus far only visit to Brazil. Actual work begun in January, 1969, and it opened on March 4, 1974.
Its official name is “President Costa e Silva Bridge”, in honor of the Brazilian president who ordered its construction. “Rio-Niteroi” started as a descriptive nickname that soon became better known than the official name. Today, hardly anyone refers to it by its official name.

6. Penang Bridge

Penang Bridge

The Penang Bridge (Jambatan Pulau Pinang in Malay) E 36 is a dual-carriageway toll bridge that connects Gelugor on the island of Penang and Seberang Prai on the mainland of Malaysia on the Malay Peninsula. The bridge is also linked to the North-South Expressway in Prai and Jelutong Expressway in Penang. It was officially opened to traffic on September 14, 1985. The total length of the bridge is 13.5 km (8.4 miles), making it among the longest bridges in the world, the longest bridge in the country as well as a national landmark. PLUS Expressway Berhad is the concession holder which manages it.

5. Vasco da Gama Bridge

Vasco da Gama Bridge

The Vasco da Gama Bridge (Portuguese: Ponte Vasco da Gama, pron. IPA: ['põt(?) 'va?ku d? 'g?m?]) is a cable-stayed bridge flanked by viaducts and roads that spans the Tagus River near Lisbon, capital of Portugal. It is the longest bridge in Europe (including viaducts), with a total length of 17.2 km (10.7 mi), including 0.829 km (0.5 mi) for the main bridge, 11.5 km (7.1 mi) in viaducts, and 4.8 km (3.0 mi) in dedicated access roads. Its purpose is to alleviate the congestion on Lisbon’s other bridge (25 de Abril Bridge), and to join previously unconnected motorways radiating from Lisbon.

4. Chesapeake Bay Bridge

Chesapeake Bay Bridge

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge (commonly known as the Bay Bridge) is a major dual-span bridge in the U.S. state of Maryland; spanning the Chesapeake Bay, it connects the state’s Eastern and Western Shore regions. At 4.3 miles (7 km) in length, the original span was the world’s longest continuous over-water steel structure when it opened in 1952. The bridge is officially named the William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after William Preston Lane, Jr. who, as governor of Maryland, implemented its construction.

3. King Fahd Causeway

The King Fahd Causeway is multiple dike – bridge combination connecting Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and the island nation of Bahrain.

King Fahd Causeway Bridge

A construction agreement signed on July 8, 1981 led to construction beginning the next year. The cornerstone was laid on November 11, 1982 by King Fahd of Saudi Arabia and Sheikh Isa bin Salman al-Khalifa of Bahrain; construction continued until 1986, when the combination of several bridges and dams were completed. The causeway officially opened for use on November 25, 1986.

2. Donghai Bridge

Donghai Bridge

Donghai Bridge (simplified Chinese: ????; traditional Chinese: ????; pinyin: D?ngh?i Dàqiáo; literally “East Sea Grand Bridge”) is the longest cross-sea bridge in the world and the longest bridge in Asia. It was completed on December 10, 2005. It has a total length of 32.5 kilometres (20.2 miles) and connects Shanghai and the offshore Yangshan deep-water port in China. Most of the bridge is a low-level viaduct. There are also cable-stayed sections to allow for the passage of large ships, largest with span of 420 m.

1. Lake Pontchartrain Causeway

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge

The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, or the Causeway, consists of two parallel bridges that are the longest bridges in the world by total length.[2] These parallel bridges cross Lake Pontchartrain in southern Louisiana. The longer of the two bridges is 23.87 miles (38.42 km) long. The bridges are supported by over 9,000 concrete pilings. The two bridges feature bascule spans over the navigation channel 8 miles (13 km) south of the north shore. The southern terminus of the Causeway is in Metairie, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans. The northern terminus is at Mandeville, Louisiana.

Ten Longest Bridges In World

Posted in Uncategorized on March 18, 2010 by Patel smital

Here is a list of the ten longest bridges in the world with pictures and descriptions. Those beautiful photos are showing to us that there are no borders and everything is reachable.

10. Seven Mile Bridge

Seven Mile Bridge

The Seven Mile Bridge, in the Florida Keys, runs over a channel between the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Strait, connecting Key Vaca (the location of the city of Marathon, Florida) in the Middle Keys to Little Duck Key in the Lower Keys. Among the longest bridges in existence when it was built, it is one of the many bridges on US 1 in the Keys, where the road is called the Overseas Highway.

9. San Mateo-Hayward Bridge

San Mateo Hayward Bridge

The San Mateo-Hayward Bridge (commonly called San Mateo Bridge) is a bridge crossing California’s San Francisco Bay in the United States, linking the San Francisco Peninsula with the East Bay. More specifically, the bridge’s western end is in Foster City, the most recent urban addition to the eastern edge of San Mateo. The eastern end of the bridge is in Hayward. The bridge is owned by the state of California, and is maintained by Caltrans, the state highway agency.

8. Confederation Bridge

confederation bridge

The Confederation Bridge (French: Pont de la Confédération) is a bridge spanning the Abegweit Passage of Northumberland Strait, linking Prince Edward Island with mainland New Brunswick, Canada. It was commonly referred to as the “Fixed Link” by residents of Prince Edward Island prior to its official naming. Construction took place from the fall of 1993 to the spring of 1997, costing $1.3 billion. The 12.9-kilometre (8 mi) long bridge opened on 31 May 1997.

7. Rio-Niteroi Bridge

Rio Niteroi Bridge

The Rio-Niteroi Bridge is a reinforced concrete structure that connects the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Niteroi in Brazil.
Construction began symbolically on August 23, 1968, in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in their first and thus far only visit to Brazil. Actual work begun in January, 1969, and it opened on March 4, 1974.
Its official name is “President Costa e Silva Bridge”, in honor of the Brazilian president who ordered its construction. “Rio-Niteroi” started as a descriptive nickname that soon became better known than the official name. Today, hardly anyone refers to it by its official name.

6. Penang Bridge

Penang Bridge

The Penang Bridge (Jambatan Pulau Pinang in Malay) E 36 is a dual-carriageway toll bridge that connects Gelugor on the island of Penang and Seberang Prai on the mainland of Malaysia on the Malay Peninsula. The bridge is also linked to the North-South Expressway in Prai and Jelutong Expressway in Penang. It was officially opened to traffic on September 14, 1985. The total length of the bridge is 13.5 km (8.4 miles), making it among the longest bridges in the world, the longest bridge in the country as well as a national landmark. PLUS Expressway Berhad is the concession holder which manages it.

5. Vasco da Gama Bridge

Vasco da Gama Bridge

The Vasco da Gama Bridge (Portuguese: Ponte Vasco da Gama, pron. IPA: ['põt(?) 'va?ku d? 'g?m?]) is a cable-stayed bridge flanked by viaducts and roads that spans the Tagus River near Lisbon, capital of Portugal. It is the longest bridge in Europe (including viaducts), with a total length of 17.2 km (10.7 mi), including 0.829 km (0.5 mi) for the main bridge, 11.5 km (7.1 mi) in viaducts, and 4.8 km (3.0 mi) in dedicated access roads. Its purpose is to alleviate the congestion on Lisbon’s other bridge (25 de Abril Bridge), and to join previously unconnected motorways radiating from Lisbon.

4. Chesapeake Bay Bridge

Chesapeake Bay Bridge

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge (commonly known as the Bay Bridge) is a major dual-span bridge in the U.S. state of Maryland; spanning the Chesapeake Bay, it connects the state’s Eastern and Western Shore regions. At 4.3 miles (7 km) in length, the original span was the world’s longest continuous over-water steel structure when it opened in 1952. The bridge is officially named the William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after William Preston Lane, Jr. who, as governor of Maryland, implemented its construction.

3. King Fahd Causeway

The King Fahd Causeway is multiple dike – bridge combination connecting Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and the island nation of Bahrain.

King Fahd Causeway Bridge

A construction agreement signed on July 8, 1981 led to construction beginning the next year. The cornerstone was laid on November 11, 1982 by King Fahd of Saudi Arabia and Sheikh Isa bin Salman al-Khalifa of Bahrain; construction continued until 1986, when the combination of several bridges and dams were completed. The causeway officially opened for use on November 25, 1986.

2. Donghai Bridge

Donghai Bridge

Donghai Bridge (simplified Chinese: ????; traditional Chinese: ????; pinyin: D?ngh?i Dàqiáo; literally “East Sea Grand Bridge”) is the longest cross-sea bridge in the world and the longest bridge in Asia. It was completed on December 10, 2005. It has a total length of 32.5 kilometres (20.2 miles) and connects Shanghai and the offshore Yangshan deep-water port in China. Most of the bridge is a low-level viaduct. There are also cable-stayed sections to allow for the passage of large ships, largest with span of 420 m.

1. Lake Pontchartrain Causeway

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge

The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, or the Causeway, consists of two parallel bridges that are the longest bridges in the world by total length.[2] These parallel bridges cross Lake Pontchartrain in southern Louisiana. The longer of the two bridges is 23.87 miles (38.42 km) long. The bridges are supported by over 9,000 concrete pilings. The two bridges feature bascule spans over the navigation channel 8 miles (13 km) south of the north shore. The southern terminus of the Causeway is in Metairie, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans. The northern terminus is at Mandeville, Louisiana.

List of longest bridges in the world

Posted in Uncategorized on March 18, 2010 by Patel smital
Name  ↓ Length
metres (feet) ↓
Span
metres (feet) ↓
Completed  ↓ Traffic  ↓ Country  ↓
Weihe Grand Bridge
Zhengzhou-Xi’an Passenger Dedicated Line
&0000000000079732.00000079,732 m (261,588 ft) &0000000000000080.00000080 m (260 ft)[1] 2008 (Complete)
2010 (Open)
Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Bang Na Expressway &0000000000054000.00000054,000 m (177,000 ft) &0000000000000044.00000044 m (144 ft) 2000 Road Thailand Thailand
Lake Pontchartrain Causeway
longest bridge over water
&0000000000038442.00000038,442 m (126,122 ft) &0000000000000046.00000046 m (151 ft) 1956 (SB)
1969 (NB)
Road United States United States
Manchac Swamp bridge &0000000000036710.00000036,710 m (120,440 ft) ? 1970 Road United States United States
Yangcun Bridge
Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway
&0000000000035812.00000035,812 m (117,493 ft)[2] ? 2007 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Hangzhou Bay Bridge
longest bridge over sea
&0000000000035673.00000035,673 m (117,037 ft) &0000000000000448.000000448 m (1,470 ft) 2007 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Runyang Bridge &0000000000035660.00000035,660 m (116,990 ft) [3] &0000000000001490.0000001,490 m (4,890 ft) 2005 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Donghai Bridge &0000000000032500.00000032,500 m (106,600 ft) &0000000000000400.000000400 m (1,300 ft) 2005 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Shanghai Maglev line &0000000000029908.00000029,908 m (98,123 ft)[4] ? 2004 Rail
(Maglev)
People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Atchafalaya Basin Bridge &0000000000029290.00000029,290 m (96,100 ft) ? 1973 Road United States United States
Yanshi Bridge
Zhengzhou-Xi’an Passenger Dedicated Line
&0000000000028543.00000028,543 m (93,645 ft) [5] ? 2009 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
King Fahd Causeway &0000000000027000.00000027,000 m (89,000 ft) ? 1986 Road Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia and Bahrain Bahrain
Jintang Bridge &0000000000026540.00000026,540 m (87,070 ft) ? 2009 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
The No. 1 bridge (Guanghualu – Babaocun)
Tianjin Binhai Mass Transit
&0000000000025800.00000025,800 m (84,600 ft) ? 2003 Rail (Metro) People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (in Virginia) &0000000000024140.00000024,140 m (79,200 ft) ? 1964 (SB)
1996 (NB)
Road United States United States
Liangshui River Bridge
Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway
&0000000000021563.00000021,563 m (70,745 ft)[2] ? 2007 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Yongding New River Bridge
Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway
&0000000000021133.00000021,133 m (69,334 ft)[6] ? 2007 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
6th October Bridge &0000000000020500.00000020,500 m (67,300 ft) ? 1996 Road Egypt Egypt
C215 Viaduct[7]
Taiwan High-Speed Rail
&0000000000020000.00000020,000 m (66,000 ft) ? 2007 Rail Republic of China Republic of China (Taiwan)
Incheon Bridge &0000000000018384.00000018,384 m (60,315 ft)[8] 800 2009 Road South Korea South Korea
Aérotrain Test Track &0000000000018000.00000018,000 m (59,000 ft) ? 1965 Rail
(kind of)
France France
Bonnet Carré Spillway bridge of I-10 &0000000000017702.00000017,702 m (58,077 ft) ? 1960s Road United States United States
Vasco da Gama Bridge &0000000000017185.00000017,185 m (56,381 ft) &0000000000000450.000000450 m (1,480 ft) 1998 Road Portugal Portugal
Cross Beijing Ring Roads Bridge
Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway
&0000000000015595.00000015,595 m (51,165 ft)[2] ? 2007 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Penang Bridge &0000000000013500.00000013,500 m (44,300 ft) &0000000000000225.000000225 m (738 ft) 1985 Road Malaysia Malaysia
Kam Sheung Road-Tuen Mun viaduct (part of West Rail Line) &0000000000013400.00000013,400 m (44,000 ft) ? 2003 Rail Hong Kong Hong Kong
Wuppertal Schwebebahn &0000000000013300.00000013,300 m (43,600 ft) &0000000000000033.00000033 m (108 ft) 1903 Rail
(kind of)
Germany Germany
Rio-Niterói Bridge &0000000000013290.00000013,290 m (43,600 ft) &0000000000000300.000000300 m (980 ft) 1974 Road Brazil Brazil
New Ulyanovsk Bridge &0000000000012980.00000012,980 m (42,590 ft)[9] 220 2009 Road and light metro Russia Russia
Confederation Bridge &0000000000012900.00000012,900 m (42,300 ft) &0000000000000250.000000250 m (820 ft) (43x) 1997 Road Canada Canada
Jubilee Parkway &0000000000012875.00000012,875 m (42,241 ft) ? 1978 Road United States United States
Novyi Saratovskiy Bridge[10] &0000000000012760.00000012,760 m (41,860 ft) &0000000000001228.0000001,228 m (4,029 ft) 2000 Road Russia Russia
Emsland test facility &0000000000012000.00000012,000 m (39,000 ft) ? 1985 Rail
(Maglev)
Germany Germany
Qingshuihe Bridge[11]
Qingzang Railway
&0000000000011700.00000011,700 m (38,400 ft) ? 2006 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Leziria Bridge[12] &0000000000011670.00000011,670 m (38,290 ft) &0000000000000133.000000133 m (436 ft) 2007 Portugal Portugal
Hyderabad (P.V. Expressway)
Express way connecting hyderabad to Hyderabad International Airport
&0000000000011600.00000011,600 m (38,100 ft) ? 2009 Road India India
San Mateo-Hayward Bridge &0000000000011265.00000011,265 m (36,959 ft) ? 1967 Road United States United States
Seven Mile Bridge &0000000000010887.00000010,887 m (35,719 ft) &0000000000000041.00000041 m (135 ft) 1982 Road United States United States
Sunshine Skyway Bridge &0000000000010500.00000010,500 m (34,400 ft) &0000000000000366.000000366 m (1,201 ft) 1987 Road United States United States
Third Mainland Bridge &0000000000010500.00000010,500 m (34,400 ft) ? 1991 Road Nigeria Nigeria
Shandong-Henan Yellow River Bridge[13] &0000000000010282.00000010,282 m (33,734 ft) ? 1985 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Wuhu Yangtze River Bridge &0000000000010020.00000010,020 m (32,870 ft) &0000000000000312.000000312 m (1,024 ft) 2000 Road & Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Hosur Road Elevated Expressway (Bangalore)
Expressway connecting Downtown Bangalore to Electronics City on Hosur Road
&0000000000009945.0000009,945 km (6,180 mi) ? 2010 Road India India
Shanghai Yangtze River Bridge &0000000000009970.0000009,970 m (32,710 ft) &0000000000000730.000000730 m (2,400 ft) 2009 Road (& future Rail) People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Norfolk Southern Lake Pontchartrain Bridge &0000000000009300.0000009,300 m (30,500 ft) ? ? Rail United States United States
Chacahoula Swamp Bridge &0000000000009005.0000009,005 m (29,544 ft) ? 1995 United States United States
Twin Span bridge of I-10 &0000000000008851.0000008,851 m (29,039 ft) ? 1962 (Original)
2009 (New WB)
2011 (New EB)
Road United States United States
Richmond-San Rafael Bridge &0000000000008851.0000008,851 m (29,039 ft) &0000000000000317.000000317 m (1,040 ft) 1956 Road United States United States
General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge &0000000000008678.0000008,678 m (28,471 ft) &0000000000000235.000000235 m (771 ft) 1962 Road Venezuela Venezuela
Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge &0000000000008369.0000008,369 m (27,457 ft) ? 2002 Road United States United States
Yangpu Bridge &0000000000008354.0000008,354 m (27,408 ft) &0000000000000602.000000602 m (1,975 ft) 1993 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Xiasha Bridge[14] &0000000000008230.0000008,230 m (27,000 ft) &0000000000000232.000000232 m (761 ft) 1991 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Sutong Bridge &0000000000008206.0000008,206 m (26,923 ft) &0000000000001088.0000001,088 m (3,570 ft) 2008 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Mackinac Bridge &0000000000008038.0000008,038 m (26,371 ft) &0000000000001158.0000001,158 m (3,799 ft) 1957 Road United States United States
Destrehan Swamp Freeway &0000000000007902.0000007,902 m (25,925 ft) ? 1992 Road United States United States
Öresund Bridge &0000000000007845.0000007,845 m (25,738 ft) &0000000000000490.000000490 m (1,610 ft) 1999 Road & rail Denmark Denmark/Sweden Sweden
Maestri Bridge &0000000000007693.0000007,693 m (25,240 ft) &0000000000000011.00000011 m (36 ft) 1928 Road United States United States
Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge[15] &0000000000007675.0000007,675 m (25,180 ft) &0000000000000216.000000216 m (709 ft) 1992 Road & rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
James River Bridge &0000000000007425.0000007,425 m (24,360 ft) &0000000000000126.000000126 m (413 ft) 1983 Road United States United States
Gwangan Bridge &0000000000007420.0000007,420 m (24,340 ft) ? 2002 Road South Korea South Korea
Champlain Bridge (Montreal) &0000000000007414.0000007,414 m (24,324 ft) &0000000000000215.000000215 m (705 ft) 1967 Road Canada Canada
Seohae Bridge[16] &0000000000007310.0000007,310 m (23,980 ft) &0000000000000470.000000470 m (1,540 ft) 2000 South Korea South Korea
Chesapeake Bay Bridge (in Maryland) &0000000000006946.0000006,946 m (22,789 ft) ? 1952, 1973 Road United States United States
Huey P. Long Bridge &0000000000007000.0000007,000 m (23,000 ft) ? 1936 Road & rail United States United States
Great Belt Bridge (Eastern) &0000000000006790.0000006,790 m (22,280 ft) &0000000000001624.0000001,624 m (5,328 ft) 1998 Road Denmark Denmark
Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge &0000000000006772.0000006,772 m (22,218 ft) &0000000000000160.000000160 m (520 ft) 1968 Road & rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Great Belt Bridge (Western) &0000000000006611.0000006,611 m (21,690 ft) ? 1998 Road & rail Denmark Denmark
Thanlwin Bridge (Mawlamyaing) &0000000000006589.0000006,589 m (21,617 ft) ? 2005 Road, rail & pedestrian Myanmar Myanmar
Astoria-Megler Bridge &0000000000006545.0000006,545 m (21,473 ft) &0000000000000375.000000375 m (1,230 ft) 1966 Road United States United States
Öland bridge &0000000000006072.0000006,072 m (19,921 ft) &0000000000000130.000000130 m (430 ft) 1972 Road Sweden Sweden
Libertador General San Martín Bridge &0000000000005966.0000005,966 m (19,573 ft) &0000000000000220.000000220 m (720 ft) 1976 Road Uruguay Uruguay and
Argentina Argentina
Hernando de Soto Bridge &0000000000005954.0000005,954 m (19,534 ft) &0000000000000274.000000274 m (899 ft) 1973 Road United States United States
Garden City Skyway &0000000000005633.0000005,633 m (18,481 ft) ? 1963 Road Canada Canada
Bandra-Worli Sea Link &0000000000005600.0000005,600 m (18,400 ft) &0000000000000250.000000250 m (820 ft) 2009 Road India India
Pulaski Skyway &0000000000005636.0000005,636 m (18,491 ft) &0000000000000168.000000168 m (551 ft) 1932 Road United States United States
Albemarle Sound Bridge[17] &0000000000005627.0000005,627 m (18,461 ft) ? 1990 United States United States
Mahatma Gandhi Setu &0000000000005575.0000005,575 m (18,291 ft) ? 1982 Road India India
Island Eastern Corridor (Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay section) &0000000000005500.0000005,500 m (18,000 ft) 1983 Road Hong Kong Hong Kong
Suramadu Bridge &0000000000005438.0000005,438 m (17,841 ft) &0000000000000434.000000434 m (1,424 ft) 2009 Road Indonesia Indonesia
Dauphin Island Bridge &0000000000005430.0000005,430 m (17,810 ft) &0000000000000122.000000122 m (400 ft) 1982 United States USA
Xinkai River Bridge of Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway &0000000000005371.0000005,371 m (17,621 ft)[6] ? 2007 Rail People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
King Fahd Causeway Bridge I &0000000000005194.0000005,194 m (17,041 ft) ? 1986 Road Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia
Hell Gate Bridge &0000000000005182.0000005,182 m (17,001 ft) &0000000000000310.000000310 m (1,020 ft) 1916 Rail United States United States
Second Severn Crossing &0000000000005128.0000005,128 m (16,824 ft) &0000000000000456.000000456 m (1,496 ft) 1996 Road United Kingdom United Kingdom
Zeeland Bridge &0000000000005022.0000005,022 m (16,476 ft) &0000000000000095.00000095 m (312 ft) 1965 Road Netherlands Netherlands
Malir River Bridge &0000000000005000.0000005,000 m (16,000 ft) ? 2009 Road Pakistan Pakistan
Candaba Viaduct[18] &0000000000005000.0000005,000 m (16,000 ft) ? 2005 Philippines Philippines
Buckman Bridge &0000000000004968.0000004,968 m (16,299 ft) &0000000000000076.00000076 m (249 ft) 1970 Road United States United States
Tappan Zee Bridge &0000000000004881.0000004,881 m (16,014 ft) &0000000000000736.000000736 m (2,415 ft) 1955 Road United States United States
Howard Frankland Bridge II &0000000000004846.0000004,846 m (15,899 ft) ? 1991 Road United States United States
Howard Frankland Bridge I &0000000000004838.0000004,838 m (15,873 ft) ? 1959 Road United States United States
Wright Memorial Bridge &0000000000004828.0000004,828 m (15,840 ft) ? 1930 Road United States United States
Jamuna Bridge &0000000000004800.0000004,800 m (15,700 ft) &0000000000000100.000000100 m (330 ft) (47x) 1998 Road & rail Bangladesh Bangladesh
Shenzhen Western Corridor Bridge &0000000000004770.0000004,770 m (15,650 ft) &0000000000000210.000000210 m (690 ft) 2007 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Vallarpadam to Edapally &0000000000004620.0000004,620 m (15,160 ft) &0000000000000007.0000007 m (23 ft) 2009 Rail India India [19]
Lindsay C. Warren Bridge[20] &0000000000004550.0000004,550 m (14,930 ft) ? 1960 United States United States
Gandy Bridge I &0000000000004529.0000004,529 m (14,859 ft) ? 1975 Road United States United States
Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge &0000000000004480.0000004,480 m (14,700 ft) ? 1962 Road United States United States and
Canada Canada
Jingzhou Yangtze River Bridge[21] &0000000000004398.0000004,398 m (14,429 ft)[22] &0000000000000500.000000500 m (1,600 ft) 2002 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Aqua Bridge (Tokyo Bay Aqua-Line) &0000000000004384.0000004,384 m (14,383 ft) ? 1997 Road Japan Japan
Bayside Bridge &0000000000004270.0000004,270 m (14,010 ft) ? 1993 Road United States United States
Hochstraße Elbmarsch[23] &0000000000004258.0000004,258 m (13,970 ft) &0000000000000035.00000035 m (115 ft) 1974 Road Germany Germany
Commodore Barry Bridge &0000000000004240.0000004,240 m (13,910 ft) &0000000000000501.000000501 m (1,644 ft) 1974 Road & pedestrian United States United States
Gandy Bridge II &0000000000004226.0000004,226 m (13,865 ft) ? 1997 Road United States United States
Escambia Bay Bridge &0000000000004224.0000004,224 m (13,858 ft) ? 2004 (new span) Road United States United States
Greenville Bridge &0000000000004133.0000004,133 m (13,560 ft) &0000000000000420.000000420 m (1,380 ft) 2007 Road United States United States
Rosario-Victoria Bridge &0000000000004098.0000004,098 m (13,445 ft) &0000000000000330.000000330 m (1,080 ft) 2003 Road Argentina Argentina
Crescent City Connection &0000000000004093.0000004,093 m (13,428 ft) &0000000000000480.000000480 m (1,570 ft) 1958 Road United States United States
Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge &0000000000004023.0000004,023 m (13,199 ft) &0000000000000471.000000471 m (1,545 ft) 2005 Road United States United States
Fred Hartman Bridge &0000000000004000.0000004,000 m (13,000 ft) &0000000000000381.000000381 m (1,250 ft) 1995 Road United States United States
Zacatal Bridge &0000000000003982.0000003,982 m (13,064 ft) ? 1994 Road Mexico Mexico
Chris Smith Bridge &0000000000003954.0000003,954 m (12,972 ft) &0000000000000265.000000265 m (869 ft) 1973 United States United States
Köhlbrandbrücke &0000000000003940.0000003,940 m (12,930 ft) &0000000000000520.000000520 m (1,710 ft) 1974 Road Germany Germany
Herbert C. Bonner Bridge [24] &0000000000003921.0000003,921 m (12,864 ft) ? 1963 United States United States
Akashi-Kaikyō Bridge &0000000000003911.0000003,911 m (12,831 ft) &0000000000001991.0000001,991 m (6,532 ft) 1998 Road Japan Japan
Lupu Bridge (bridge with the longest arc) &0000000000003900.0000003,900 m (12,800 ft) &0000000000000550.000000550 m (1,800 ft) 2003 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Suez Canal Bridge &0000000000003900.0000003,900 m (12,800 ft) &0000000000000440.000000440 m (1,440 ft) 2001 Road Egypt Egypt
The First Kitakami River Bridge[citation needed] &0000000000003868.0000003,868 m (12,690 ft) ? 1982 Rail Japan Japan
Ponte della Libertà &0000000000003850.0000003,850 m (12,630 ft) ? 1846/1933 Road & rail Italy Italy
Queen Isabella Causeway[25] &0000000000003810.0000003,810 m (12,500 ft) ? 1974 Road United States United States
Santhià Viaduct[26] &0000000000003782.0000003,782 m (12,408 ft) ? 2006 Italy Italy
Rodoferroviária Bridge &0000000000003770.0000003,770 m (12,370 ft) &0000000000000100.000000100 m (330 ft) 1998 Road & rail Brazil Brazil
Kansai International Airport Bridge[27] &0000000000003750.0000003,750 m (12,300 ft) ? 1994 Japan Japan
Dona Ana Bridge &0000000000003670.0000003,670 m (12,040 ft) &0000000000000080.00000080 m (260 ft) 1934 Rail Mozambique Mozambique
Walt Whitman Bridge &0000000000003652.0000003,652 m (11,982 ft) &0000000000000610.000000610 m (2,000 ft) 1957 Road United States United States
Humen Pearl River Bridge &0000000000003618.0000003,618 m (11,870 ft) &0000000000000888.000000888 m (2,913 ft) 1957 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Ayrton Senna Bridge &0000000000003607.0000003,607 m (11,834 ft) ? 1998 Brazil Brazil
Fadalto Viaduct[28] &0000000000003567.0000003,567 m (11,703 ft) ? 1990 Italy Italy
Tay Rail Bridge &0000000000003500.0000003,500 m (11,500 ft) ? 1887 Rail United Kingdom United Kingdom
San Diego-Coronado Bridge &0000000000003407.0000003,407 m (11,178 ft) ? 1969 Road United States United States
Lake Jesup Bridge &0000000000003379.0000003,379 m (11,086 ft) ? 1993 United States United States
Saint-Nazaire Bridge &0000000000003356.0000003,356 m (11,010 ft) &0000000000000404.000000404 m (1,325 ft) 1974 Road France France
King Fahd Causeway Bridge II &0000000000003334.0000003,334 m (10,938 ft) ? 1986 Road Bahrain Bahrain
Third Bridge &0000000000003300.0000003,300 m (10,800 ft) &0000000000000260.000000260 m (850 ft) 1989 Road Brazil Brazil
Delaware Memorial Bridge II &0000000000003291.0000003,291 m (10,797 ft) &0000000000000655.000000655 m (2,149 ft) 1968 Road United States United States
Delaware Memorial Bridge I &0000000000003281.0000003,281 m (10,764 ft) &0000000000000655.000000655 m (2,149 ft) 1951 Road United States United States
Luling Bridge &0000000000003261.0000003,261 m (10,699 ft) &0000000000000376.000000376 m (1,234 ft) 1983 Road United States United States
Dames Point Bridge &0000000000003245.0000003,245 m (10,646 ft) &0000000000000396.000000396 m (1,299 ft) 1989 Road United States United States
Storstrøm Bridge &0000000000003199.0000003,199 m (10,495 ft) &0000000000000136.000000136 m (446 ft) 1937 Road & rail Denmark Denmark
Second Orinoco crossing (Orinoquia Bridge) &0000000000003156.0000003,156 m (10,354 ft) &0000000000000300.000000300 m (980 ft) 2006 Road & rail Venezuela Venezuela
San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge &0000000000003141.0000003,141 m (10,305 ft) &0000000000000018.00000018 m (59 ft) 1933 Road United States United States
Heishipu Bridge[29] &0000000000003068.0000003,068 m (10,066 ft) &0000000000000162.000000162 m (531 ft) 2004 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Nehru Setu[30] &0000000000003065.0000003,065 m (10,056 ft) &0000000000000031.00000031 m (102 ft) Rail India India
Talmadge Memorial Bridge &0000000000003060.0000003,060 m (10,040 ft) &0000000000000335.000000335 m (1,099 ft) 1990 Road United States United States
Kolia Bhomora Setu &0000000000003015.0000003,015 m (9,892 ft) ? 1987 Road India India
Jiangyin Suspension Bridge &0000000000003000.0000003,000 m (9,800 ft) &0000000000001385.0000001,385 m (4,544 ft) 1999 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
C310 Viaduct[31] &0000000000003000.0000003,000 m (9,800 ft) ? 2007 Republic of China Republic of China (Taiwan)
Re Island Bridge[32] &0000000000002927.0000002,927 m (9,603 ft) &0000000000000110.000000110 m (360 ft) 1988 France France
Benjamin Franklin Bridge &0000000000002918.0000002,918 m (9,573 ft) &0000000000000533.000000533 m (1,749 ft) 1926 Road, rail & pedestrian United States United States
Hiroshima Kaida Bridge &0000000000002900.0000002,900 m (9,500 ft) ? 1990 Japan Japan
Rio-Antirio bridge &0000000000002880.0000002,880 m (9,450 ft) &0000000000001410.0000001,410 m (4,630 ft) 2004 Road Greece Greece
Queen Elizabeth II Bridge (Dartford Crossing) &0000000000002872.0000002,872 m (9,423 ft) &0000000000000450.000000450 m (1,480 ft) 1991 Road United Kingdom United Kingdom
Oleron Bridge[33] &0000000000002862.0000002,862 m (9,390 ft) &0000000000000080.00000080 m (260 ft) 1966 France France
Second Quiantang River Bridge[34] &0000000000002861.0000002,861 m (9,386 ft) &0000000000000080.00000080 m (260 ft) 1991 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Rügenbrücke &0000000000002831.0000002,831 m (9,288 ft) &0000000000000583.000000583 m (1,913 ft) 2007 Road Germany Germany
Big Obukhovsky Bridge &0000000000002824.0000002,824 m (9,265 ft) &0000000000000382.000000382 m (1,253 ft) 2004 Road Russia Russia
Saratov Bridge &0000000000002804.0000002,804 m (9,199 ft) ? 1965 Road Russia Russia
Giurgiu-Rousse Friendship Bridge &0000000000002800.0000002,800 m (9,200 ft) ? 1954 Road & rail Romania Romania and
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Hornibrook Bridge &0000000000002800.0000002,800 m (9,200 ft) ? 1935 Pedestrian & cyclist Australia Australia
Third Mainland Bridge &0000000000002800.0000002,800 m (9,200 ft) ? 1988 Road Nigeria Nigeria
Houghton Highway &0000000000002740.0000002,740 m (8,990 ft) ? 1979 Road Australia Australia
Victoria Bridge &0000000000002790.0000002,790 m (9,150 ft) ? 1859 Road & rail Canada Canada
Old Godavari Bridge &0000000000002745.0000002,745 m (9,006 ft) ? 1900 India India
Golden Gate Bridge &0000000000002737.0000002,737 m (8,980 ft) &0000000000001280.0000001,280 m (4,200 ft) 1937 Road United States United States
New Godavari Bridge &0000000000002730.0000002,730 m (8,960 ft) ? 1997 Road & rail India India
Laviolette Bridge &0000000000002707.0000002,707 m (8,881 ft) &0000000000000335.000000335 m (1,099 ft) 1967 Road Canada Canada
Jacques Cartier Bridge &0000000000002687.0000002,687 m (8,816 ft) &0000000000000334.000000334 m (1,096 ft) 1930 Road Canada Canada
Dumbarton Bridge &0000000000002621.0000002,621 m (8,599 ft) &0000000000000104.000000104 m (341 ft) 1982 Road, pedestrian & cyclist United States United States
Banghwa Bridge[35] &0000000000002599.0000002,599 m (8,527 ft) &0000000000000180.000000180 m (590 ft) 2000 South Korea South Korea
Kremsbrücke Pressingberg[36] &0000000000002607.0000002,607 m (8,553 ft) ? 1980 Road Austria Austria
Alex Fraser Bridge &0000000000002602.0000002,602 m (8,537 ft) &0000000000000465.000000465 m (1,526 ft) 1986 Road Canada Canada
Khabarovsk Bridge &0000000000002590.0000002,590 m (8,500 ft) ? 1999 Road & rail Russia Russia
Betsy Ross Bridge &0000000000002586.0000002,586 m (8,484 ft) &0000000000000222.000000222 m (728 ft) 1976 Road United States United States
West Gate Bridge &0000000000002582.0000002,582 m (8,471 ft) &0000000000000336.000000336 m (1,102 ft) 1978 Road Australia Australia
Burlington Bay Skyway &0000000000002561.0000002,561 m (8,402 ft) &0000000000000150.000000150 m (490 ft) 1958 Road Canada Canada
Richard I. Bong Memorial Bridge &0000000000002559.0000002,559 m (8,396 ft) ? 1985 Road United States United States
Forth Bridge &0000000000002529.0000002,529 m (8,297 ft) &0000000000000521.000000521 m (1,709 ft) 1890 Rail United Kingdom United Kingdom
Forth Road Bridge &0000000000002512.0000002,512 m (8,241 ft) &0000000000001006.0000001,006 m (3,301 ft) 1964 Road United Kingdom United Kingdom
Sunshine Bridge &0000000000002510.0000002,510 m (8,230 ft) &0000000000000251.000000251 m (823 ft) 1964 Road United States United States
Nhon Hoi Bridge &0000000000002477.0000002,477 m (8,127 ft) &0000000000000015.00000015 m (49 ft) 2006 Vietnam Vietnam
Drežnik Viadukt[37] &0000000000002485.0000002,485 m (8,153 ft) &0000000000000070.00000070 m (230 ft) 2001 Croatia Croatia
Zilwaukee Bridge &0000000000002466.0000002,466 m (8,091 ft) &0000000000000119.000000119 m (390 ft) 1988 Road United States United States
Millau Viaduct &0000000000002460.0000002,460 m (8,070 ft) &0000000000000342.000000342 m (1,122 ft) 2004 Road France France
Rama VIII Bridge &0000000000002450.0000002,450 m (8,040 ft) &0000000000000300.000000300 m (980 ft) 2002 Road & pedestrian Thailand Thailand
John A. Blatnik Bridge &0000000000002430.0000002,430 m (7,970 ft) ? 1961 Road United States United States
Shantou Bay Bridge &0000000000002425.0000002,425 m (7,956 ft) &0000000000000452.000000452 m (1,483 ft) 1995 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Golden Ears Bridge &0000000000002410.0000002,410 m (7,910 ft) &0000000000000968.000000968 m (3,176 ft) 2009 Road Canada Canada
Bubiyan Bridge &0000000000002380.0000002,380 m (7,810 ft) &0000000000000054.00000054 m (177 ft) 1983 Kuwait Kuwait
Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge &0000000000002375.0000002,375 m (7,792 ft) &0000000000000244.000000244 m (801 ft) 1957 Road United States United States
Newburgh-Beacon Bridge &0000000000002374.0000002,374 m (7,789 ft) &0000000000000305.000000305 m (1,001 ft) 1963 Road United States United States
Sidney Lanier Bridge &0000000000002371.0000002,371 m (7,779 ft) &0000000000000381.000000381 m (1,250 ft) 2003 Road United States United States
General Artigas Bridge &0000000000002350.0000002,350 m (7,710 ft) &0000000000000334.000000334 m (1,096 ft) 1975 Road Uruguay Uruguay and
Argentina Argentina
Pamban Bridge (Road) &0000000000002345.0000002,345 m (7,694 ft) &0000000000000115.000000115 m (377 ft) 1988 Road India India
Marabá Mixed Bridge &0000000000002340.0000002,340 m (7,680 ft) ? 1984 Brazil Brazil
Juan Pablo II Bridge &0000000000002310.0000002,310 m (7,580 ft) ? 1974 Road Chile Chile
Evergreen Point Floating Bridge &0000000000002310.0000002,310 m (7,580 ft) &0000000000002285.0000002,285 m (7,497 ft) (floating) 1963 Road United States United States
Rho Viaduct[38] &0000000000002300.0000002,300 m (7,500 ft) ? 2007 Italy Italy
Fuller Warren Bridge &0000000000002286.0000002,286 m (7,500 ft) &0000000000000076.00000076 m (249 ft) 2002 Road United States United States
Ambassador Bridge &0000000000002283.0000002,283 m (7,490 ft) &0000000000000564.000000564 m (1,850 ft) 1929 Road Canada Canada and
United States United States
25 de Abril Bridge &0000000000002278.0000002,278 m (7,474 ft) &0000000000001013.0000001,013 m (3,323 ft) 1966 Road & rail Portugal Portugal
Mahanadi River Bridge &0000000000002258.0000002,258 m (7,408 ft) ? ? Road & rail India India
Maurício Joppert Bridge &0000000000002250.0000002,250 m (7,380 ft) &0000000000000112.000000112 m (367 ft) 1964 Brazil Brazil
Teodoro Moscoso Bridge &0000000000002250.0000002,250 m (7,380 ft) ? 1993 Road Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
Tay Road Bridge &0000000000002250.0000002,250 m (7,380 ft) ? 1966 Road & pedestrian United Kingdom United Kingdom
Beška Bridge[39] &0000000000002250.0000002,250 m (7,380 ft) &0000000000000210.000000210 m (690 ft) 1975 Road Serbia Serbia
Jamestown-Verrazano Bridge &0000000000002240.0000002,240 m (7,350 ft) &0000000000000183.000000183 m (600 ft) 1992 Road United States United States
McKees Rocks Bridge &0000000000002225.0000002,225 m (7,300 ft) &0000000000000229.000000229 m (751 ft) 1931 Road United States United States
Anping Bridge[40] &0000000000002223.0000002,223 m (7,293 ft) ? 1151 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Humber Bridge &0000000000002220.0000002,220 m (7,280 ft) &0000000000001410.0000001,410 m (4,630 ft) 1979 Road United Kingdom United Kingdom
Novo Oriente Bridge &0000000000002200.0000002,200 m (7,200 ft) &0000000000000050.00000050 m (160 ft) 1990 Brazil Brazil
Tsing Ma Bridge &0000000000002200.0000002,200 m (7,200 ft) &0000000000001377.0000001,377 m (4,518 ft) 1997 Road & rail Hong Kong Hong Kong
San Juanico Bridge &0000000000002200.0000002,200 m (7,200 ft) &0000000000001377.0000001,377 m (4,518 ft) 1979 Road & pedestrian Philippines Philippines
Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge &0000000000002170.0000002,170 m (7,120 ft) &0000000000000189.000000189 m (620 ft) 1987 Road United States United States
Llacolen Bridge[41] &0000000000002157.0000002,157 m (7,077 ft) ? 2000 Chile Chile
Novosibirsk Metro Bridge &0000000000002145.0000002,145 m (7,037 ft) ? 1986 Rail (Metro) Russia Russia
Pont de Normandie &0000000000002141.0000002,141 m (7,024 ft) &0000000000000856.000000856 m (2,808 ft) 1995 Road France France
Igelsta Bridge &0000000000002140.0000002,140 m (7,020 ft) &0000000000000100.000000100 m (330 ft) 1995 Rail Sweden Sweden
Viadotto San Floriano[42] &0000000000003567.0000003,567 m (11,703 ft) ? 1990 Italy Italy
Surgut Bridge &0000000000002110.0000002,110 m (6,920 ft) &0000000000000408.000000408 m (1,339 ft) 2000 Road Russia Russia
Des Plaines River Valley Bridge &0000000000002100.0000002,100 m (6,900 ft) ? 2007 Road United States United States
Port Mann Bridge &0000000000002093.0000002,093 m (6,867 ft) &0000000000000366.000000366 m (1,201 ft) 1964 Road Canada Canada
Manhattan Bridge &0000000000002089.0000002,089 m (6,854 ft) &0000000000000448.000000448 m (1,470 ft) 1909 Road, rail & pedestrian United States United States
Pamban Bridge (Rail) &0000000000002065.0000002,065 m (6,775 ft) &0000000000000115.000000115 m (377 ft) 1914 Rail India India
Honavar Rail &0000000000002065.0000002,065 m (6,775 ft) ? ? Rail India India
Poughkeepsie Bridge &0000000000002064.0000002,064 m (6,772 ft) &0000000000000160.000000160 m (520 ft) 1889 Pedestrian United States United States
Asparuhov Most &0000000000002050.0000002,050 m (6,730 ft) &0000000000000160.000000160 m (520 ft) 1976 Road Bulgaria Bulgaria
Verrazano-Narrows Bridge &0000000000002034.0000002,034 m (6,673 ft) &0000000000001298.0000001,298 m (4,259 ft) 1964 Road United States United States
King Fahd Causeway Bridge III &0000000000002034.0000002,034 m (6,673 ft) ? 1986 Road Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia
Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge &0000000000002019.0000002,019 m (6,624 ft) ? 1993 Road United States United States
Delaware River-Turnpike Toll Bridge &0000000000002003.0000002,003 m (6,572 ft) &0000000000000208.000000208 m (682 ft) 1956 Road United States United States

[edit] Under construction

Name  ↓ Length
kilometres (miles) ↓
Span
metres (feet) ↓
Year  ↓ Traffic  ↓ Country  ↓
Danyang–Kunshan Bridge (Beijing-Shanghai Express Railway) &0000000000000164.000000164 km (102 mi)[43] 2013 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Yongdinghe Bridge of Beijing-Shijizhuang Express Railway &0000000000000051.89000051.89 km (32.24 mi)[44] 2012 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Qatar-Bahrain Causeway[45] &0000000000000040.00000040 km (25 mi) 2013 Qatar Qatar and
Bahrain Bahrain
Jiaozhou Bay Bridge &0000000000000035.40000035.4 km (22.0 mi) 2010 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Louisiana Highway 1 bridge [46] &0000000000000029.00000029 km (18 mi)[43] 2011 Road United States United States
Bridge of the Horns &0000000000000029.00000029 km (18 mi) 2020 Road Yemen Yemen / Djibouti Djibouti
Penang Second Bridge &0000000000000023.40000023.4 km (14.5 mi) &0000000000000250.000000250 m (820 ft)[clarification needed] 2012 Road Malaysia Malaysia
Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge (main bridge) &0000000000000022.80000022.8 km (14.2 mi) &0000000000000460.000000460 m (1,510 ft) 2016 Road People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Mumbai Trans Harbour Link &0000000000000022.00000022 km (14 mi) 2014 Road and Metro India India
Chennai Port – Maduravoyal Expressway &0000000000000019.00000019 km (12 mi) &0000000000001932.0000001,932 m (6,339 ft) 2009, completed in 2013 Road Indiaindia
Nanjing Dashengguan Chang Jiang Bridge of Beijing-Shanghai Express Railway &0000000000000014.00000014 km (8.7 mi)[43] 2013 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Nanjing Qinhuai River Bridge of Beijing-Shanghai Express Railway &0000000000000012.00000012 km (7.5 mi)[43] 2013 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Third Orinoco crossing (Mercosur Bridge)[47][48] &0000000000000011.10000011.1 km (6.9 mi) 2011 Venezuela Venezuela
Zhenjiang Beijing–Hangzhou Canal Bridge of Beijing-Shanghai Express Railway &0000000000000011.00000011 km (6.8 mi)[43] 2013 People's Republic of China People’s Republic of China
Podilskyi Metro Bridge[49] &0000000000000007.0000007 km (4.3 mi) 2010 Ukraine Ukraine

World’s 10 Largest Car Manufacturers

Posted in Uncategorized on March 18, 2010 by Patel smital

bullet Toyota

Toyota Japanese car maker Toyota Motor Corporation is the world’s largest car manufacturer. It has sold 3,564,105 units in the first half of 2009 compared to 4,815,442 units in the first half of 2008. Though Toyota reported an annual net loss of US$4.4 billion on May 8, 2009, it could still emerge as the world’s largest car maker. The Japanese giant has been severely affected by the 2007-2009 financial crises. Toyota ventured into the automobile industry in 1934 with its first product Type A engine. It manufactured in its first passenger car the Toyota AA in 1936. Toyota Motor Corporation was established as an independent and separate company in 1937.

bullet General Motors

General Motors General Motors was established in 1908 by William C. Durant. It is world’s second-largest car maker. General Motors was world’s number one car company for consecutive 77 years from 1931 to 2007. Because of the economic conditions, the beleaguered car giant went bankrupt on June 1, 2009. On 10th July 2009, the company emerged from” Chapter 11 bankruptcy” reorganization. In spite of all these, General Motors could sell 3,552,722 units compared to last year’s 4,541,125 units.

bullet Volkswagen

Volkswagen The Volkswagen Group is the world’s third largest car maker. It sold 3,100.300 units this year compared to 3,265,200 units of previous years. The Volkswagen Group constitutes the car brands like Audi AG, Bentley Motors Ltd., Automobiles Bugatti SA, Automobili Lamborghini Holding S.p.A., SEAT, Skoda Auto and heavy goods vehicle manufacturer Scania AB. Recently, Porsche has united with the Volkswagen Group. The German luxury car company was founded on May 28, 1937 under the leadership of Adolf Hitler. Adolf Hitler wanted a “people’s car”. Volkswagen literally means ‘people’s car’ in German.

bullet Hyundai-Kia

Hyundai-Kia Hyundai-Kia has emerged as the world’s fourth largest car manufacturer. This year Hyundai-Kia jumped up a rank above. The Korean car maker showed global sales for the first half of 2009 at 2,153,000 units. The Indian subsidiary of Hyundai Kia Automotive Group, the Hyundai Motors India, is the country’s second largest car manufacturer. The Hyundai Motor Company was founded in 1967. It became the Hyundai Kia Automotive Group when Hyundai Motor Company purchased 51% of South Korea’s second-largest car company, Kia Motors in 1998.

bullet Ford

Ford Ford Motor Company was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. Presently, it is world’s fifth largest car maker with 2,145,000 units of global sales. This year, Hyundai-Kia edged out the mighty Ford of the fourth position. In 2007, Ford fell from second to third-ranked car maker for the first time in 56 years, behind only General Motors and Toyota.

bullet PSA Peugeot-Citroen

PSA Peugeot-Citroen The French car company sold 1,586,900 units in 2009. Last year it showed a sale of 1,844,700 units. The company was formed in 1976 and sells under the Peugeot and Citroen brand names. PSA is the second largest automaker based in Europe.

bullet Honda

Honda The Honda Motor Company secures the seventh place with sales units of 1,586,000 compared to last year’s 2,022,00 units. Honda became Japan’s second largest car maker in 2001 by superseding Nissan. Moreover, Honda is the world’s largest manufacturer of motorcycles as well as the world’s largest manufacturer of internal combustion engines. The company was founded by Soichiro Honda on 24th September 1948. Soichiro Honda dreamed to provide a personal mobility to everyone. The first production car from Honda was the S500 sports car.

bullet Nissan

Nissan Nissan Motors was founded in 1932. It is among the top three Asian car companies. Nissan is in the eight position with 1,545,976 units. Last year it sold 2,013,611 units in the first half. Nissan faced severe financial difficulties in 1999 and entered an alliance with Renault S.A. of France. The Nissan VQ engines, of V6 configuration, have featured among Ward’s 10 Best Engines for 14 straight years, since the award’s inception.

bullet Suzuki

Suzuki Suzuki Motor Corporation is the ninth largest car manufacturer in the world. The company began as Suzuki Loom Works in 1909 under Michio Suzuki. Suzuki started producing cars in 1955. Maruti Suzuki, the Indian arm of the Japanese car honcho is India’s largest car manufacturer. The car company sold 1.152,000 units this year compared to 2008′s 1,283,000 units.

bullet Renault

Renault Renault is the world’s tenth largest car maker with 1.106.989 units this year. Last year, it sold 1.326,164 units. Renault S.A. is a French carmaker producing cars, vans, buses, tractors, and trucks since 1899. The company was formed by Louis Renault, his brothers Marcel and Fernand, and his friends Thomas Evert and Julian Wyer. Renault has joined hands with Nissan on March 27, 1999. The Nissan-Renault Alliance is world’s fourth largest car maker if their individual units were taken together. Nissan-Renault Alliance sold 2,652,965 units this year.
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